【AI艺术品“路人的记忆”将于下月拍卖】

【AI艺术品“路人的记忆”将于下月拍卖】由人工智能创作的艺术作品《路人的记忆1》将于3月6日在伦敦拍卖,估值约4万英镑。AI基于数千个西欧艺术形象,不断创作全新的男女肖像画,分别显示在与一个复古风格的木制餐具柜的两块屏幕上,产生无尽的艺术流。当一幅幅从未出现过的肖像画呈现在屏幕上,开始变化并逐渐消失,观看者会体会到如陌生路人般转瞬即逝的感觉。这是德国艺术家马里奥·克林格曼的创意。

Going, going, GONE! AI-powered art that makes unique male and female portraits which DISAPPEAR and are never seen again to sell at auction for up to £40,000

  • Memories of Passersby 1 is set to go to auction in London on March 6 
  • Two screens are attached to a wooden sideboard which contains the AI 'brain' 
  • It was trained on thousands of images of western European artwork 
  • It uses its processing power and neural network to create unique male and female portraits that disappear and are never created again 

Art-lovers staring at these portraits will be the first, and last, to ever do so.

The creation is the first self-generative AI artwork to go to auction created and only the second piece of art to be sold that uses AI.

Artificial intelligence generates the images from scratch and produces an endless sequence of unique male and female portraits that have never been seen before and will never appear again.

It is called Memories of Passersby 1, and is set to go to auction at Sotheby's in London on March 6 with an estimated value of between £30,00 and £40,000.

Two screens are attached to a retro-style wooden sideboard which contains the AI 'brain' and this produces the endless stream of art with a male-like image and a feminine image on separate displays.

Artificial intelligence generates the images from scratch and produces an endless sequence of unique male and female portraits that have never been seen before and will never appear again

Artificial intelligence generates the images from scratch and produces an endless sequence of unique male and female portraits that have never been seen before and will never appear again

Art-lovers staring at these portraits will be the first, and last, to ever see them. It is called Memories of Passersby 1, and is set to go to auction at Sotheby's in London on March 6 with an estimated value of between £30,00 and £40,000

It was created by Mario Klingemann, a German artist who promises the buyer of the unique item a lifetime of totally original and encapsulating portraits.

Electricity is all that is needed to keep the machinery operational and the AI uses a wealth of neural networks to continue learning in a similar way to the human mind.

Thousands of images of western European art were used to establish the AI and the data-set, Mr Klingeman claims.

Mr Klingemann said: 'Memories of Passersby I houses a very powerful machine which creates paintings while you look at them, which I think is quite magical.

'Neural networks are involved, and you could say that they are the brushes that I've learned to use.

'The machine is in a cycle where it continuously creates new faces that start changing and fading away - it observes itself and creates a feedback loop.

Two screens are attached to a retro-style wooden sideboard which contains the AI 'brain' and this produces the endless stream of art with male-like image and a more feminine image on the two displays

Two screens are attached to a retro-style wooden sideboard which contains the AI 'brain' and this produces the endless stream of art with male-like image and a more feminine image on the two displays

'Of course, it's hard for me let it out into the world without me by its side, but I trust that it's ready to keep creating new portraits forever, as I always hoped it would do.

'I hope that when people sit and watch these fleeting faces pass by, they will get the same feeling I do'.

The artwork's predecessor, The Portrait of Edmond de Belamy was sold in October for £337,000, despite a guide price of only $10,000.

Mr Klingemann says his work differs from that ground-breaking piece of art as it is not 'curated', where as Edmond had images cherry-picked by humans.

The AI-generated 'Portrait of Edmond Belamy' depicts a slightly blurry, chubby man in a dark frock-coat and white collar.

Christie's said the winning bidder wanted to remain anonymous, but confirmed the price skyrocketed after a five way bidding battle on the phones and via ChristiesLive.

'Behold the future—here it is,' the auctioneer declared before the bidding started on the piece.

The artwork is one of a group of portraits of the fictional Belamy family created by a Paris-based trio of 25-year-olds known as Obvious.

According to an online catalog on Christie's website, the painting had been estimated to go for $7,000-$10,000.

The art work features a fictional person named Edmond de Belamy, described by Christie's as a 'portly gentleman, possibly French and — to judge by his dark frockcoat and plain white collar — a man of the church.'

The signature on the painting is the actual algorithm used to create it.

His off-centre position leaves enough white space to show the artist's signature as 'min max Ex[log(D(x))] + Ez[log(1-D(G(z)))].

To make the painting, artist Pierre Fautrel and his team ran 15,000 classic portraits through a computer software.

Once the software 'understood the rules of portraiture,' using a new algorithm developed by Google researcher Ian Goodfellow, it then generated a series of new images by itself, Fautrel said.

The French collective selected 11, calling them the 'Belamy family,' one of which on Thursday fetched $432,500 at Christie's in New York, the epicenter of the traditional art market.

原文链接:https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6682183/Artwork-creates-unique-AI-painted-portraits-DISAPPEAR-never-created-again.html


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